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MTH HO Scale DMIR 2-8-8-4 (Worthtn.) Yellowstone, Proto-Sound 3.0, #229, 80-3261-1

$519.95

Available on backorder

MSRP: $599.95

Product Description

MTH HO DM&IR 2-8-8-4 Yellowstone With Proto-Sound 3.0
Duluth Missabe & Iron Range (DMIR) w Worthington Feedwater Heater, #229

MTH Item #: 80-3261-1

The WalthersProto DM&IR Class G2 Wood Caboose is the perfect match for this locomotive
CLICK HERE to view the Class G2 Caboose

Outfitted with Proto-Sound 3.0, wireless tether and quillable whistle, the massive Duluth Missabe & Iron Range Yellowstone debuts in the HO lineup in 2015, ready to haul the most challenging loads on your layout.

Product Features

  • Die-Cast Boiler and Tender Body
  • Die-Cast Metal Chassis
  • Authentic Paint Scheme
  • Engineer and Fireman Figures
  • Metal Handrails and Decorative Bell
  • RP25 Metal Wheels
  • Metal Wheels and Axles
  • Sprung Drivers
  • (2) #158 Scale Kadee Whisker Couplers
  • Operating Kadee Compatible Remote Controlled Proto-Coupler
  • Kadee Coupler Mounting Pads
  • Prototypical Rule 17 Lighting
  • Constant Voltage Headlight
  • Operating Marker Lights
  • Lighted Cab Interior
  • Operating Tender Back-up Light
  • Powerful 5-Pole Precision Flywheel Equipped Skew-Wound Motor
  • Synchronized Puffing ProtoSmoke System
  • Locomotive Speed Control In Scale MPH Increments
  • Wireless Drawbar w/Close Coupling Option
  • 1:87 Scale Proportions
  • Onboard DCC Receiver
  • Operates On Code 70, 83 and 100 Track
  • Proto-Sound 3.0 With The Digital Command System Featuring: Quillable Whistle
  • With Freight Yard Proto-Effects
  • Operates On 22″ Radius Curves

DCC Functions Listing:

  • F0 Head/Tail light
  • F1 Bell
  • F2 Horn
  • F3 Start-up/Shut-down
  • F4 PFA
  • F5 Lights (except head/tail)
  • F6 Master Volume
  • F7 Front Coupler
  • F8 Rear Coupler
  • F9 Forward Signal
  • F10 Reverse Signal
  • F11 Grade Crossing
  • F12 Smoke On/Off
  • F13 Smoke Volume
  • F14 Idle Sequence 3
  • F15 Idle Sequence 2
  • F16 Idle Sequence 1
  • F17 Extended Start-up
  • F18 Extended Shut-down
  • F19 Labor Chuff
  • F20 Drift Chuff
  • F21 One Shot Doppler
  • F22 Coupler Slack
  • F23 Coupler Close
  • F24 Single Horn Blast
  • F25 Engine Sounds
  • F26 Brake Sounds
  • F27 Cab Chatter
  • F28 Feature Reset

A Short History:

Owned by United States Steel, the Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Railway was built for one major purpose: to haul iron ore from the mines of Minnesota and Wisconsin to the Lake Superior ports of Duluth and Two Harbors, Minnesota. Its primary cargo was so heavy that normal hopper cars couldn’t carry it; the DM&IR’s signature rolling stock was the short “ore jenny” designed especially to haul iron ore.

As World War II loomed on the horizon, ore tonnage on the Missabe Road increased more than fourfold from 1938 to 1941, and the railway needed additional motive power. Ordered from Baldwin, the new engines were based on a Western Pacific 2-8-8-2 design. A four-wheel trailing truck was added to accommodate a larger firebox and a longer, all-weather cab for Minnesota’s bitter winters. The so-called Yellowstone 2-8-8-4 wheel arrangement had originated earlier on the Northern Pacific, where Alco had promoted the first engine of that type by hosting a sit-down dinner for 12 people in its firebox.

Delivered in the spring of 1941, the DM&IR’s first eight Yellowstones (Class M-3) were among the largest steamers ever built, in the same league as Union Pacific’s Big Boys. By at least one measure — tractive effort — the Missabe Road engines were more powerful. They pleased their owners so well that, with the permission of the War Production Board, an additional ten Yellowstones (Class M-4) were ordered for delivery in 1943. Because the new engines were delivered during a seasonal downturn in ore traffic, part of the new order was temporarily leased to the Denver & Rio Grande Western. The following year, the D&RGW asked to borrow them again, stating in a telegram that they were among the finest engines the road had ever run. Hauling trains of over 100 loaded ore cars, the DM&IR’s 2-8-8-4s soldiered on into the 1960s, with the last officially retired in 1963.

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